Asiatic Cholera: Its Origin, History, and Progress, for Over Two Hundred Years, and the Devastations it has Caused in the East and West; Its Ravages in Europe and America in 1831-2, in 1848-9, in 1854-5, and in 1865-6 with a full description of the Causes, Nature, and Character of the Disease, its Means of Propagation, whether by the Atmosphere or by Contagion; its premonitory and distictive symptoms; the Best Known Means of Preventing its Attack, Both in Communities and Individuals; and the Most Effectual Remedies for it According to the Celebrated Physicians Who Have Treated It; Together with Simple and Plain Directions for the Care of Those Who From Any Cause Can Not Obtain Medical Aid

By: Brockett LP

Price: $60.00

Quantity: 1 available


SCARCE FIRST EDITION OF MID-19TH CENTURY HISTORY OF CHOLERA. 7 1/2 inches tall hardcover, 375 pages, original brown cloth covers with gilt borders and spine, frontispiece engraving of Benabes, 'birthplace of the cholera'. Light edgewear and surface rubbed, spine faded, modern date sticker on front free endpaper, frontis browned but not fragile, light age spotting throughout, text tight and crisp, overall very good. PREFACE: 'The presence of the cholera in some of our seaports, and the very general impression that it will yet gain a foothold and commit serious, though, it is to he hoped, less extensive ravages than in former years, fully justifies the publication of a treatise on the subject, which shall be adapted for popular use.' Dedicated to Willard Parker, M.D., Professor Surgery in the U.S. College of Physicians and Surgeons, and one of the Commissioners of the Metropolitan Board of Health. APPENDIX: 'There has been hitherto a remarkable uniformity in the mortality from cholera. In 1830-32, in Great Britain and on the Continent, the deaths in private practice were about 39.5 per cent., in hospitals 57.25 per cent. 1849, in New York, the whole number of cases reported outside the hospitals in fifty-two days were 2,631, of which 915 died, or 34.78 per cent.; in the Hospitals there were 1,621 cases, of wMcli 880, or 53.71 per cent., died. Egypt, Turkey, and Italy, during the present epidemic, the number of deaths was about 55 per cent, of the whole number of cases. Paris it did not exceed 50.7 per cent, in the whole number of eases.' LINUS PIERPONT BROCKETT (1820-1893) was an American historical and miscellaneous writer, graduated from Yale Medical College in 1843. He contributed largely to encyclopædias, and published over 40 works, including 'History of Education' (1849); 'History of the Civil War' (1866); 'The Silk Industry of America' (1876).

Title: Asiatic Cholera: Its Origin, History, and Progress, for Over Two Hundred Years, and the Devastations it has Caused in the East and West; Its Ravages in Europe and America in 1831-2, in 1848-9, in 1854-5, and in 1865-6 with a full description of the Causes, Nature, and Character of the Disease, its Means of Propagation, whether by the Atmosphere or by Contagion; its premonitory and distictive symptoms; the Best Known Means of Preventing its Attack, Both in Communities and Individuals; and the Most Effectual Remedies for it According to the Celebrated Physicians Who Have Treated It; Together with Simple and Plain Directions for the Care of Those Who From Any Cause Can Not Obtain Medical Aid

Author Name: Brockett LP

Categories: Cholera, Infectious disease, History, Cholera,

Edition: First edition

Publisher: Hartford and Chicago, L. Stebbins and A. Kidder: 1866

Item: 1.00 lbs

Seller ID: 56

Keywords: America;cholera;epidemiology;history;infectious disease;surgery;war;