The Practitioner's Pharmacopoeia and Universal Formulary: containing 2000 Classified Prescriptions, selected from the Practice of the Most Eminent British and Foreign Medical Authorities, with an abstract of the Three British Pharmacopoeias, and much other useful information for the practitioner and student, with corrections and additions by an American physician

By: Foote J

Price: $100.00

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RARE FIRST EDITION OF 2000 REMEDIES FOR INJURIES AND ILLNESSES IN MID-19TH CENTURY. 7 3/4 inches tall hardcover, brown cloth boards with blindstamped pattern to covers, spine title gilt with library numbers, bookseller's embossed stamp to title page, 390 pages. Light scattered foxing, front endpaper inscribed in ink 'Prof John S. Murphy with respects of the publisher.' Page of publisher's ads inserted before title page, and after last page. Corners and top of spine rubbed, otherwise very good. Contains treatments for accidents, poisons, antacids, antihelminthics, antiscorbutics, antiseptics, antispasmodics, astringents, carminatives, cathartics, demulcents, deobstruents, diaphoretics, diuretics, emetics, emmenagogues, escharotics, expectorants, lithontriptics, narcotics and anodynes, rubefascients and vesicants, sialogogues, stimulants, tonics, Also prescriptions specially adapted for certain diseases: syphilis, gonorrhoea, and gleet; diseases of the skin; diseases of women; diseases of the eye; diseases of the ear; diseases of the teeth; and cholera (10 pages of remedies!). This is followed by a list of medical terms frequently used, and an index. SIR JOHN FOOTE, member of the Royal College of Surgeons, cared for cholera patients in London, and in 1848 reported on a cholera epidemic in St. Heliers on the island of Jersey. He reported that the source of the disease was traced to a series of buildings in George Street, a road near the sea not far from Elizabeth Castle. The six houses closest to the shore were described as 'brothels' and the occupants of these - numbering as many as 40 people - were all reported to have died from the disease. The poor in Jersey were recognised as the incubators for the spread of the disease. To try to contain it, the authorities decided to deport the poor who were not native-born while the poorest of the Islanders were despatched to tents at Gallow's Hill. There was considerable criticism of these actions and petitions presented to the British government against the 'extreme injustice' of the policy, but Foote defended the Jersey authorities in his report, suggesting it had been vital to try to curtail the disease among the narrow, densely inhabited streets of the town. In a classic story of epidemiology, John Snow identified contaminated water as the source of cholera in London in 1854.

Title: The Practitioner's Pharmacopoeia and Universal Formulary: containing 2000 Classified Prescriptions, selected from the Practice of the Most Eminent British and Foreign Medical Authorities, with an abstract of the Three British Pharmacopoeias, and much other useful information for the practitioner and student, with corrections and additions by an American physician

Author Name: Foote J

Categories: Epidemiology, Pharmacy, Pharmacy, Therapy,

Edition: 1st American

Publisher: New York, Samuel S. & William Wood: 1855

Seller ID: 14

Keywords: epidemiology;medicine;pharmacy;therapy;